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Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Los Nahuatlatos (nä wät lâ tōs) is a group with deep roots to their Xicano-Indigenous heritage, whose mission is to “create original, inspiring and innovative music on a conscious level that people of all ages and backgrounds can enjoy.” They describe their sound as “Xicano roots fusion,” because their music is a combination of different traditional Latino styles.

 

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Demitasse is a two-piece softly sung acoustic group comprised of Erik Sanden and Joe Reyes, both from the art-rock band Buttercup. Equipped with high falsetto harmonies and acoustic driven melodies, the duo sounds like the happier version of Elliott Smith or the heartbroken version of The Beach Boys.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

With the belief that music stems from an “intimacy with one’s self,” the Parallelephants say they’re using music to pioneer a new “sexual renaissance.”

Members Thomie Lazcano, Aldo Lazcano, and Dany Escobar create a soulful atmosphere through their deeply layered tracks. Originally, the group formed when Thomie and Aldo were teenagers and attempted to be pop-punk musicians.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

The Time Enders’ performance is so impressively dead-on to folk music produced in the ‘50s and ‘60s that you might wonder where they parked the time machine. Channeling the lyrical simplicity of cowboy songs and the mellower side of life, Nicholas Spyker and Orlando Gonzales create a timeless sound. Their set captured a moment in the early ‘60s where songs radiated an ethereal beauty and blossomed into the flower-power movement.

 

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