juvenile justice | Texas Public Radio

juvenile justice

Vince Kong / Texas Public Radio

Austin got rid of its youth curfew ordinance last year out of concern that it was funneling teens into the criminal justice system.

But when it came time for the San Antonio City Council to take a look at its curfew this past spring, it took a different route: rather than criminalizing youth for staying out late, it’s attempting to address why youth are staying out late in the first place.

 


From Texas Standard.

Amid allegations of physical and sexual abuse of minors in the state’s juvenile lockups, the scandal-rocked Texas Juvenile Justice Department has had a massive leadership shakeup in recent months. Gov. Greg Abbott has demanded to see an action plan to address how kids at state lockups are treated – and now the head of the Juvenile Justice Department has submitted one.

This week on "Texas Matters," we look at a major flaw in the way maternal mortality rates in Texas are tracked (00:25). Also, why are more women running for office in the state (7:53)? And, finally, we examine what's behind a new sex abuse scandal in the Texas juvenile justice system (17:39).


From Texas Standard.

Last month, the Dallas Morning News uncovered an internal email from the Texas Juvenile Justice Department. It said that at least four staffers at the Gainesville State School, a lockup for juvenile offenders, could be sent to prison for sexual misconduct at the facility. The Juvenile Justice Department is no stranger to scandal. And to fix it, a set of advocacy groups have an idea – close all of its facilities and completely rethink how the state houses young offenders.

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An average of five Texas juveniles a week were certified to be tried as adults in court from 1995 to 2015, according to data from a recent Texas Standard article. One of these kids was Miguel Navarro. At the age of 16 he was tried as an adult, found guilty of murder and sentenced to 99 years in prison. 

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