Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Members of San Antonio Alliance, the local teachers union, speak at a trustee meeting in January 2018.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Updated May 11. Final details on the number of contract teachers and administrators who are being laid off will be decided 5:30 p.m. Monday, at the Burnet Center, 406 Barrera St., during the regularly scheduled trustee meeting. People who wish speak during public comment need to sign in before the meeting begins.

Teachers across the country are pushing for better pay and increased school funding. They consistently make less than other college graduates with comparable experience — even though, for many teachers, working with students is more than a full-time job.

There are long days in the classroom, clubs and activities, planning and grading, and the many after-school hours spent with students.

Students take a study break during finals week on the main campus of The University of Texas at San Antonio Dec. 11, 2017.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The University of Texas at San Antonio has received a million dollar grant to provide computer science scholarships to women and students of color.

When Walker Goolsby was 3, school officials said he wasn't autistic because he was creative.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

In 2004, the Texas Education Agency arbitrarily decided the state should shrink special education to 8.5 percent of the student population.

After conducting an investigation, the U.S. Department of Education said the effective cap illegally barred tens of thousands of children with disabilities from a free and appropriate education.

The state agency is trying to enact reforms to make up for breaking the law, but parents and advocates say it will take a lot to regain their trust.


From Texas Standard.

After awarding full scholarships to 50 Nepalese students to attend the University of Texas at Tyler, the university revoked the scholarships because of what officials have called an “oversight.”

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