Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

A local mentor and advocacy group is launching a new scholarship program to encourage black and Latino men to become teachers.


File Photo | Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

A feel-good recognition during a state board meeting Thursday turned into a surprise for Texas Higher Education Commissioner Raymund Paredes when a college administrator told the board course transfer issues are common place, even when students follow state transfer plans called fields of study.

Students climb the stairs of the Chance Academic Center on the San Antonio College campus in June, 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Tuition will go up $13 a credit hour at the Alamo Colleges next spring.

The community college district’s board of trustees voted last Saturday to raise tuition from $86 to $99 a credit hour, bringing the cost for the average course to $297.

Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

Five days into his new role as superintendent of Edgewood Independent School District, Eduardo Hernandez said he plans to spend the next 95 days listening, learning and asking three questions:

“What do we as a district need to continue to do? What do we as a district need to start doing? And what do we as a district need to stop doing?” said Hernandez, sitting in his new office on San Antonio’s west side.

A mosaic featuring Robert E. Lee's image given as a senior class gift is among the items for sale at Lee High School's online auction. The district is putting a smaller replica in a museum in LEE's library.
North East ISD

North East Independent School District’s decision to remove the name of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from one of its high schools is again stirring controversy.

A Facebook post promoting an online auction of items featuring the school’s old name and logo is drawing a strong reaction, especially from alumni who opposed the name change and don’t think the district should profit from it.


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