Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

NEISD

The North East Independent School District’s Police Chief has resigned amid allegations of inappropriate sexual comments to his officers.

North East’s 59-year-old Police Chief, George Castaneda, resigned on Tuesday citing health concerns. His self-termination came shortly after one of his male officers brought forward allegations last week that the chief had made inappropriate comments on two separate occasions.

UTSA’s College of Business has been named the lead sponsor of the National Society of Hispanic MBAs Conference planned for San Antonio this year. 

The partnership will help attract top academic and professional talent to the national conference.

Gerry Sanders, dean of the UTSA College of Business, says the lead sponsorship for the 2013 conference offers UTSA the opportunity to showcase the school’s students to top national employers, and to build on current employer relationships.

Alamo Colleges

A recent high-school graduate enrolled at Palo Alto College will be getting word Wednesday of a 4-year, full-ride scholarship.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Texas, Inc., will present the scholarship in support of STEM education.

Toyota and other manufacturers have partnered with the Alamo Colleges to educate students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, and to train them to work in their plants assembling products from trucks to solar panels.

This time, Toyota is focusing its energy on those who teach STEM courses.

Courtesy photo / South San ISD

The South San Antonio Independent School District has a new superintendent after an on-going saga of rotating leadership.

Ryan Loyd / TPR

Eric Smith began his career as a journalist--reporting, copy editing and designing. But after a while, he felt something was missing from his life.

Smith became involved with the mentorship program, Big Brothers Big Sisters, so that he could inspire young people.

"I loved it,” he said. “It got to where I was looking forward to that more than I was looking forward to my job. That's when I knew I needed to change careers."

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