drought

wildfire in Llano County in late July 2018
Logan Schersphel / Texas A&M Forest Service

The Texas A&M Forest Service is warning residents who live in the Hill Country, north and northwest of San Antonio, to take precautions to protect their homes against wildfires as hot and dry conditions continue.  

 


Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

After four straight days of 100-degree — or hotter — weather, the temperatures are expected to drop slightly as we head into next week, the National Weather Service reports.


Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

Despite the Fourth of July rain, we remain way behind annual rainfall amounts, so the San Antonio Water System continues its crackdown on water wasters. 

From Texas Standard:

NASA says droughts are becoming more common, and will continue to be. If that's true, more lawsuits could follow. In the U.S., states are taking each other to court over what constitutes fair use of rivers and tributaries. Last week, the Supreme Court ruled in Florida v. Georgia, settling  a long-running dispute over three river systems shared among Florida, Georgia and Alabama. The decision could have significant implications for Texas' water disputes with its neighbors.

From Texas Standard.

More than 40 percent of Texas is in some stage of drought right now, according to the latest data from the U.S. Drought Monitor. Some parts of the state are especially dry, like the Panhandle and the plains south of the area. That has caused some farmers and ranchers to face difficult choices – like what to do with cattle when there’s not enough grass to graze.

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