Live At Jazz, TX

Saturdays, 7 p.m.

The culture of South Texas and America's great gift to the world, jazz music, come together each week on "Live At Jazz, TX," as Nathan Cone and Doc Watkins host an hour of great music, recorded live at Jazz, TX at the historic Pearl Brewery. On-stage and backstage interviews offer insight into the music and performers.

Hilmy

“I think ten years ago I approached the organ similarly to how I play the piano, and then I started to realize that certain things just didn't work as well,” says Doc Watkins, explaining the different technique required to switch from his normal instrument, piano, to the Hammond B3 at Jazz, TX.

Courtesy photo

“A trio can be a chamber ensemble, but it can also be a big band,” muses pianist Tamir Hendelman between tunes at Jazz, TX. “You have rhythm, you have harmony, you have melody.”

What else could you need?

This summer, we’re back at it with another season of jazz and blues from the heart of the Pearl Brewery. “Live At Jazz, TX” brings you hot sets from regional and national talent like Marcia Ball, Herlin Riley, and San Antonio’s own Doc Watkins, owner and proprietor of the titular club.

The first episode features Doc Watkins in a trio setting with bassist Mike Porter and drummer Brandon Guerra, and the swing is in full effect. As Watkins says, the three get along so well because they know when to bring the energy, and when to relax.

Aaron Prado was born to be a jazz musician. Seriously. His father George Prado, of the long-running Regency Jazz Band in San Antonio, gave his son the middle name Ellington. While still in the crib, his parents played recordings of classic jazz records by Keith Jarrett and John Coltrane to the newborn baby.

Ben Briseno

To listen to Johnny P and the Wise Guys is to be transported back in time to smoke-filled rooms at the casinos of old in the 1960s. Vocalist Johnny Panzarella has been fronting his band since 2007. Growing up in New York, Panzarella was turned on to singers like Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, and Dean Martin. “It was all around the house, and it rubs off on you. It sticks with you. I always latched on to jazz-oriented music and the standards.”

Pages