Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

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Ryan Poppe / 2018

For some Texans, there’s big money in deer. Breeding and raising whitetail deer, running deer hunts on ranches, it’s all part of a multibillion-dollar industry. But since 2015, deer breeders and the state have been locked in an old-fashioned standoff.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has restricted the movement of this deer population in an effort to contain chronic wasting disease. Meanwhile, the Texas deer industry says this hurts its livelihood, and it plans to push lawmakers to make changes during the 2019 legislative session.

 


Ryan E. Poppe

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has refused to defend the Texas Ethics Commission against a lawsuit, saying the agency itself violates the state’s constitution.  

 

 


Ryan Poppe

There are few actions that suggest a run for higher office — like the presidency — as strongly as making speeches at the Iowa State Fair, which is where San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro will be this weekend.


State Rep. Pete Gallego, D-Alpine
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

A Travis County state judge dismisses Republican claims that the Democratic candidate for Texas Senate District 19 is not a resident of the district.


Ryan E. Poppe / Texas Public Radio

U.S. Senator Ted Cruz and President Trump share a stormy political relationship but they might have to put that aside in time for the midterm elections. Political experts say Cruz will also need to walk a fine line in terms of how much help he actually gets from the president.


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