David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

David Martin Davies

Host, "The Source," "Texas Matters"

David Martin Davies is  a veteran journalist with more than 20 years of experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. 

Davies is the host of "The Source," an hour-long live call-in news program that airs on KSTX at noon Monday through Thursday. Since 1999 he was been the host and producer of "Texas Matters," a weekly radio news magazine and podcast that looks at the issues, events and people in the Lone Star State. 

Davies' reporting has been featured on National Public Radio, American Public Media's "Marketplace" and the BBC. He has written for The San Antonio Light, The San Antonio Express-News, The Texas Observer and other publications.

His reporting has been recognized with numerous awards. Davies was named the 2008 Texas Radio Journalist of the Year by the Houston Press Club. In 2015, he was recognized with two First Amendment Awards by the Fort Worth Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The Association for Women in Communications San Antonio Professional Chapter honored Davies with the 2015 Edna McGaffey Media Excellence Headliner Award.

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A federal judge recently blocked a Texas law requiring the burial or cremation of fetal tissue resulting from an abortion or miscarriage.

Jonathan Saenz, an attorney for Texas Values, is an advocate for tough anti-abortion laws. Molly Duane, an attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights, sued Texas over the legality of the fetal tissue law. They join us on this episode of Texas Matters.


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Some Hispanic-Americans, born in the U.S., who have applied for an American passport have been accused of fraud and are being jailed in immigration detention centers. Andre Segura, the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, joins Texas Matters to discuss the issue. Also, paid sick leave is at the center of debate in Texas (14:40).


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Will an ambitious $12 billion project called the Texas Spine protect the Gulf Coast from future hurricane storm surges and who will pay for it? We'll hear from Len Waterworth, a retired coloniel in the Army Corp of Engineers, and Brandt Mannchen, with the Sierra Club.  Then, Texas turtle meat is now off the menu in Asia now that the shell-shocked reptile is protected (17:41). And can Bitcoin make it rain money again in Rockdale? (22:41).


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Texas has made an effort to crack down on teachers and coaches who have sex and other inappropriate relationships with their students. Is it enough? 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Hurricane Harvey was followed by a massive release of highly toxic chemicals in the coastal area. Ilan Levin, Texas Director of the Environmental Integrity Project, joins us to discuss how better to prepare for future disasters.

Then, Texas Observer environment reporter Naveena Sadasivam (14:46) will talk about a nine-part series called "Shallow Watters," which looks at the impact of global warming on the Rio Grande River.


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