Environment | Texas Public Radio

Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members reporting designed to help improve and draw attention to the region's health and environment.

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LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

From Texas Standard:

In south Texas, cotton farmers are beginning to reap what they've sown. The harvest season starts in the Rio Grande Valley, and slowly creeps north throughout the fall. Whether it's drought, hail, flood, or pests, there's plenty that can go wrong while growing cotton. But farmers aren't clear of the hazards once they get the crop out of the ground. They still have to avoid cotton contamination. That's something that Jimmy Roppolo knows quite a bit about. He's the general manager of United Ag Cooperative in El Campo, where they're starting to gin this season's cotton.

From Texas Standard:

Texas has seen an abundance of red tides within the last few decades and it can be just as ominous as it sounds. Red tide is a harmful algae bloom caused by plant cells that multiply out of control, killing fish in the area and causing potential respiratory infections on land. Researchers are working on a system that would send out red tide warnings to vulnerable populations.

From Texas Standard:

NASA says droughts are becoming more common, and will continue to be. If that's true, more lawsuits could follow. In the U.S., states are taking each other to court over what constitutes fair use of rivers and tributaries. Last week, the Supreme Court ruled in Florida v. Georgia, settling  a long-running dispute over three river systems shared among Florida, Georgia and Alabama. The decision could have significant implications for Texas' water disputes with its neighbors.

From Texas Standard.

There’s nothing new about plastic straws. They’ve been around for decades. But there has been a recent backlash against them.

Eric Hamerman, a marketing professor and expert in consumer behavior at Iona College in New York, says the change has to do with a new awareness of our impact on the environment.

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