Border & Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Border & Immigration

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

The West Side of San Antonio is predominantly poor and Hispanic, and has a reputation for being crime-ridden. But many of its residents wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

Many of the West Side’s oldest residents have stories to tell, but historians normally don’t come knocking on their doors. Their stories are now compiled in “Still Here: Homenaje al Westside de San Antonio.


Office of Representative Henry Cuellar

Andrés Manuel López Obrador is Mexico’s newest president. The 65-year-old populist painted himself as a champion for Mexico’s poor.

Jorge Valencia, KJZZ’s senior field correspondent, was in Mexico City for Saturday’s inauguration. He said López Obrador laid out a laundry list of issues he hopes to accomplish in the next six years, including fighting corruption in the Mexican government.


Photo courtesy of Paso del Sur

When we think of “urban renewal,” trendy coffee shops and shopping centers often come to mind. But what about the people living in the zones destined for demolition? Yolanda Chávez Leyva, a professor at the University of Texas at El Paso, was on the front lines in the fight to save the people and the history of El Paso’s oldest neighborhood: Barrio Duranguito.


Visit El Paso / https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitelpaso/8953466050

Poor neighborhoods in many cities are experiencing urban renewal. As a result, many long-time residents of those neighborhoods can no longer afford to live in the homes they have known for generations.

Yolanda Chávez Leyva, an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at El Paso, specializes in the history of the border and said residents of El Segundo Barrio managed to save their neighborhood from developers in 2006. That’s when the Paso del Norte group announced a downtown revitalization plan.


William Henry Ellis was born a slave in Victoria, Texas, in 1864 — a year before slavery was abolished in the state.

Ellis was able to take advantage of his proximity to the border — and his light complexion — to reinvent himself as Mexican businessman, Guillermo Enrique Eliseo.

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