Border & Immigration

With more than 700,000 open immigration cases across the country, judges face a lengthy backlog. Two retired District Court judges in California have proposed a solution: They petitioned Attorney General Jeff Sessions to let them and other retired federal judges return to the bench.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Judge Marilyn Hall Patel, one of the judges who wrote to the Justice Department, about why retired federal judges are a good fit for the job.

Along the dry, rocky desert of El Paso, Texas, a brown fence stretches for miles. The fence marks the southern U.S. border that separates El Paso from its Mexican sister city, Juarez.

Twenty-two-year-old Antonio Villaseñor-Baca was born and raised in El Paso. His hometown is part of a huge "borderplex," where three cities — El Paso, Texas; Las Cruces, N.M.; and Juarez, Mexico — converge. Villaseñor-Baca has an uncle in Juarez, and while growing up, his dad would take him back and forth over the border a lot.

To Villaseñor-Baca, Juarez doesn't seem like another country.

New York University Press

Laura E. Gómez is a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles.  Her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race” explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.

Gómez said when 19th century Americans started moving west, they encountered Mexican-Americans, which fell in between the existing racial class of black and white.


New York University Press

On Fronteras:

 

In 1848,  the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo brought to an end the Mexican-American war, which was started in 1846 over a territorial dispute in Texas. The treaty led to land that has become Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah and Wyoming.

Laura E. Gómez, a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles, joins us to discuss her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race,” which explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.


Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Several families divided by the Trump administration's family separation policies have reunited in San Antonio before beginning the next stage of their journey.


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