Arts & Culture | Texas Public Radio

Arts & Culture

Arts and culture news, criticism, and programming from TPR/NPR.

Alfred A. Knopf, publisher

In December 2007, the "Mitchell Report," detailing the use of performance enhancing drugs by dozens of Major League Baseball players, was released. Roger Clemens was among the players listed in that report. The new book "American Icon: The Fall of Roger Clemens and the Rise of Steroids in America's Pastime" lays bare the corruption that has plagued baseball for years, and chronicles the downfall of Katy, Texas-native Clemens. 

Next week, Kelly Blair, a former gym owner from Pasadena, Texas, will testify before a federal grand jury that is believed to be investigating Clemens for perjury. Clemens testified under oath before a congressional committee in February, 2008 that he had never used steroids or human growth hormone. Nathaniel Vinton is one of four investigative writers from the New York Daily News that has been following this story.

MGM

Remember "The Alamo?" Fifty years ago, actor John Wayne and crew set up shop outside of Bracketville, Texas, to film an ambitious re-telling of the epic story of the Battle for Texas Independence.  "The Alamo" was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture.  It won one award for its impressive sound design.   Although there have been subsequent films of the Alamo story, many people still hold John Wayne’s version close to their hearts.

Courtesy Photo

The first thing you notice when meeting the San Antonio trio Girl in a Coma in person is how tiny singer Nina Diaz seems. Walking down a hallway in the studios of Texas Public Radio, carrying an acoustic guitar sans case, she looks for all the world like a singer of wispy, confessional coffeehouse folk songs — a light green sweater covers the kaleidoscope of tattoos coloring both of her arms.

Nathan Cone

Musicians find inspiration in the darndest places.  Take Charlie Roadman, of the Austin-based group F for Fake.  Ancient Greek conflicts are generally not high up on the list of things that songwriters write about, but Roadman, an admitted history buff, has been thinking about the Peloponnesian War for some time, ever since he first encountered Thucydides’ account of the war as an undergraduate at San Antonio’s Trinity University.  Now Roadman has a new musical project with his F for Fake band mates.

“I have spent more than 35 years of my professional life trying to find out who we are,” says filmmaker Ken Burns. His documentary, “The National Parks,” is a six-part series that traces the history and development of the National Parks System, from the moment the first white settlers laid eyes on Yosemite, to the acts of congress that created the parks. The film also tells the stories of those officials and citizens that help preserve the parks for future generations.

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