Texas Public Radio
David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Pentagon: Air Force Failed To Prevent Sutherland Springs Shooter From Buying Guns

A new investigation found that the Air Force repeatedly failed to report information that might have prevented an ex-airman who killed 26 people at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs from purchasing a gun.

Read More
The Source is a daily, one-hour program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our guests and a citywide audience.

National News

All The Criminal Charges To Emerge So Far From Robert Mueller's Investigation

The longer special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has gone on, the more President Trump has railed against it. Since the investigation began in May 2017, the president has taken to Twitter and dismissed it as a "witch hunt" more than 125 times. That criticism aside, the special counsel investigation has resulted in criminal counts against more than 30 people and three Russian entities. And while the final outcome of the Mueller probe...

Read More

The estate tax — or, as critics like to call it, the "death tax" — is getting some buzz in political stump speeches in Iowa. Several Republican candidates — from presidential nominee Mitt Romney on down the ticket — have been attacking the estate tax as harmful to family farmers who want to pass on land to their children.

Foreign Policy Debate: Rhetoric Vs. Reality

Oct 21, 2012

President Obama and GOP presidential nominee Gov. Mitt Romney are getting ready to answer any and all possible questions about foreign policy for Monday night's debate, the last one before the Nov. 6 election.

Iran, Israeli-Palestinian talks and China are among likely topics for the debate — and also major issues awaiting the next president. Each case is a matter of building and maintaining alliances while applying pressure to protect U.S. interests.

About a year ago, writer Jason Sheeler was working on a story about Hermès scarves — the elaborately decorated silk squares that can cost as much as $400. He traveled to Lyon, in southern France, to visit the factory, and on his first day there he found an even more interesting story: A French woman threw out a big scarf with a turkey on it and asked Sheeler if he knew Kermit. He didn't.

Kermit, as it turns out, is Kermit Oliver. He lives in Waco, Texas, and he's the only American to ever design scarves for Hermès.

Whenever 19-year-old Robbie Walsh tells friends and family back home in Maryland that he goes to Lynn University, they do a double-take.

"They go, 'Lynn University? What?'" he says. "Then I have to tell them it's in Boca Raton, Florida, and a lot of them say, 'Oh, FAU,' or 'The University of Miami.'"

Many of Lynn's students and faculty who gather at the campus cafe say they hear that sort of thing all the time. But university spokesman Joshua Glanzer says a new T-shirt showing up on campus gives it right back.

Former Sen. George McGovern died early Sunday in his hometown of Sioux Falls, S.D. He was 90 years old, and had been in failing health. McGovern served two terms in the House and three in the Senate, but was best known as the Democratic Party's ill-fated nominee against President Nixon in the election of 1972.

McGovern's Candidacy Inspired New Wave Of Voters

Oct 21, 2012

Former Sen. George McGovern, the liberal senator from conservative South Dakota, died on Sunday. He was 90 years old.

McGovern lost the 1972 presidential race to Richard Nixon by a landslide, carrying only Massachusetts. But his candidacy and opposition to the Vietnam War were embraced by a new generation of voters.

The defining moments in McGovern's life included not only winning the Democratic nomination for president in 1972, and not just the dismal loss to Nixon that followed, but also safely landing an airplane that the German army had tried to blow out of the sky.

Sen. George McGovern Dies

Oct 21, 2012

Sen. George McGovern, who lost the 1972 presidential bid to Richard Nixon yet inspired a new generation of voters, has died. He was 90.

A family spokesman told the AP that McGovern died at 5:15 a.m. Sunday at a hospice in Sioux Falls, S.D., surrounded by family and friends.

If the thought of eating horse meat makes you queasy, what about strong, sturdy oxen? A small Vermont college that emphasizes sustainable living will soon slaughter two beloved campus residents: Bill and Lou, a pair of oxen. Green Mountain College plans to serve the meat from the oxen in its dining hall, but the plan has drawn international outcry and a massive Facebook petition to save the oxen.

When President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney meet for their third presidential debate on Monday, there will be some rules for the candidates — and the audience.

In the first debate, Jim Lehrer of PBS demanded "Absolute silence!" Although Lehrer caught some flack for letting the candidates freewheel in that debate, he meant business when it came to keeping the audience quiet.

"If you hear something that's really terrific, sit on it!" he told the audience. "If you hear something you don't like, sit on it!"

But that's not the only debate rule — not by far.

In the end, it's an argument about competence.

The Obama administration's response to the Sept. 11 killings at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, has become a staple of the campaign. It's bound to come up again during Monday's debate about foreign policy.

Mitt Romney will use the event — which left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens — to question President Obama's veracity and his handling of foreign policy in general.

Pages

Worth Repeating: OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

7 p.m., Dec. 11: Brick at Blue Star

Young Talent Competition

Open to area middle school and high school students

Holiday Programming on TPR

A full list of all of TPR's holiday offerings this year!

Arts & Culture

Brittain Pittman / Contributed Photo

Pianist, band-leader and Jazz TX nightclub owner Doc Watkins is throwing a great big musical party this weekend.


Decca/UMG

Welcome to Major Themes, a monthly feature in which classical music experts recommend a must-hear recording based on what's happening at classical stations and programs around the country. This month, we checked in with friends in Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Vermont. Here are their top picks for the holiday season.

Will Langmore / Contribruted Photo

San Antonio's newest chamber group, Agarita, has set ambitious goals.

Violinist Sarah Silver Manzke said the quartet’s objective is to break down “the outdated notion of the ivory tower” by getting into the community.

“(We are about) doing things that maybe been tried a little bit here and there, but really fully committing to it,” she said.


Nathan Cone / TPR

Pianist Sung Chang first drew the attention of San Antonio audiences in 2016, when he was awarded the silver medal at the San Antonio International Piano Competition (now known as The Gurwitz International Piano Competition). Since then, he’s returned to the Alamo City nearly a half-dozen times.

“I like the city… and especially the audiences,” Chang said after performing for the Tuesday Musical Club on November 27. “They are always very warm.”

More Stories

TPR Generation Listen

Generation Listen

TPR's Young Professional Network

San Antonio's Tricentennial

As San Antonio celebrates its 300 years of history, TPR is reporting on the celebrations, as well as the historical & cultural milestones that have made the city what it is today.