Texas Public Radio

Experts Say Senate District 19 Win Critical For Republicans

One major goal of Texas Republican leaders is to keep their supermajority of votes in the state Senate — and with Pete Flores' victory in Senate District 19, they are one step closer to that objective.

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The Source is a daily, one-hour program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our guests and a citywide audience.

National News

After The Rains, Casualties Mount Amid Florence's Still-Rising Floodwaters

As floodwaters from former-Hurricane Florence's massive rains continue to flow through the Carolinas, the end of the storm's damage is nowhere in sight. In Horry County, S.C., two women being taken for mental health care died on Tuesday night when the sheriff's office van they were being transported in met floodwaters. The deputies transporting the two women reportedly drove around barriers and then were surprised by the flood. Authorities told media outlets that the deputies couldn't get the...

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Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The midterm election is two months away but southwest Texas is gearing up for a special election first. Republican Pete Flores and Democrat Pete Gallego are contending for State Senate District 19, a seat former State Sen. Carlos Uresti vacated after he received a 12-year prison sentence in June 2018.  


Updated at 1:41 p.m.

Willie Velasquez grew up on San Antonio’s West Side, and learned early on that by empowering his fellow Latinos, they could bring change to their own neighborhoods.

In 1974, Velasquez founded the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and organized 1,000 voter drives across the Southwest. His efforts also more than doubled the number of Latino elected officials, from 1,500 in 1974 to 3,300 in 1988.

A new book for young adults reflects on the life of voting rights activist and West Side San Antonio native Willie Velasquez. Author Bárbara Renaud Gonzalez  (0:17) joins us to discuss her new novel. Then, a West Side San Antonio record shop spins the oldies and keeps neighborhood pride alive (15:57).


Jason Murgo

As the weather begins to cool, San Antonio's music scene is heating up.

For example, Camerata San Antonio is in celebration mode. Cellist and co-founder Ken Freudigman explains that the group has reached an important milestone.

 

"It's the beginning of our 15th season here in San Antonio playing great chamber music," he said.

Their weekend performances will mark that anniversary with a special theme.

Dave.see / http://bit.ly/2Qtu2Mb

A new study finds a San Antonio program designed to inspire Latino students to pursue doctoral degrees and to work in cancer research is having measurable success.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

San Antonio will roll out a six-month pilot program for electric scooters if City Council approves the measure next month.

Ryan E. Poppe

State lawmakers are studying how housing instability, homelessness and mental illness are interconnected and what changes might reduce the state’s overall homeless population.


Jessica A DuVernay/U.S. Army

From Texas Standard:

You’ve heard of minimally invasive surgery – it’s often called laparoscopic surgery. Instead of making a large cut in a patient, and moving tissues and organs that are in the way, doctors make smaller cuts and focus on just the area they need to with the help of a tiny camera.

From Texas Standard:

After a dry summer in west Texas, locals would love nothing more than to be able to summon a rainstorm on command. This isn't a new desire; humans have a long history of trying to harness the clouds to do their bidding. Katie Nodjimbadem recently wrote about a wave of efforts to do that in Texas in the late 1800s, for Smithsonian Magazine.

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TPR Member Reception with Terri Hendrix

Join us before her show in Kerrville on Wednesday, September 26

Worth Repeating: SUCKER PUNCH

October 2, 7pm: Brick at Blue Star

Arts & Culture

Kyle Keener and Polly Harrison have been playing music in San Antonio for a long time. How long?

“Curtis Calderon, who we play with [at Jazz, TX] on every third Tuesday, says we played Santa Anna’s quinceañera—for his daughter,” Keener jokes. “We go back pretty far.”

Jason Murgo

As the weather begins to cool, San Antonio's music scene is heating up.

For example, Camerata San Antonio is in celebration mode. Cellist and co-founder Ken Freudigman explains that the group has reached an important milestone.

 

"It's the beginning of our 15th season here in San Antonio playing great chamber music," he said.

Their weekend performances will mark that anniversary with a special theme.

Opera San Antonio opens its season at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts this Thursday and Saturday night with “La Traviata,” a doomed romance by Giuseppe Verdi that’s nevertheless full of life. It’s one of the most popular works in the operatic repertoire.

Baritone Weston Hurt, from Texas, plays the role of Giorgio Germont, father to Alfredo, played by San Antonio native David Portillo. In the story, Germont is the one who tries to keep Alfredo and his love, Violetta, apart.

Josh Huskin

A San Antonio-based artist and singer has released a new album with the hopes that it underscores our common humanity.

 


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Join SOLI Chamber Ensemble On Stage!

We're co-hosting the second annual OPEN MIC NIGHT on November 5 at Jazz, TX

TPR Generation Listen

Generation Listen

TPR's Young Professional Network

San Antonio's Tricentennial

As San Antonio celebrates its 300 years of history, TPR is reporting on the celebrations, as well as the historical & cultural milestones that have made the city what it is today.